Mining for Water

Mining for Water

It’s no secret that Big Sky’s water resources are fragile. Water quantity and quality are heavily dependent on a deep winter snowpack and large rain events in the spring, summer, and fall. This precipitation recharges our groundwater resources. As summer wears on and...
Prioritizing Restoration

Prioritizing Restoration

The upper Gallatin River is famous for its easy access. From the Yellowstone National Park boundary to the mouth of Gallatin Canyon, anglers, rafters, and kayakers enjoy almost 40 miles of public waterway and riverbank—but this convenience is not without consequence....
Quality Control

Quality Control

Since 2000, the Gallatin River Task Force has monitored water quality in the upper Gallatin watershed. Staffers and volunteers have routinely sampled several locations throughout the watershed to determine how land-use practices impact our streams, creeks, and rivers....
Recreating Responsibly

Recreating Responsibly

As temps warm, we’re all raring to get back outside and stay there, passing the time along our riverbanks, trails, ridgelines, and shorelines. In the Upper Gallatin watershed, we enjoy nearly unencumbered access to outdoor recreation, but with that access comes...
Sowing a Healthy Gallatin

Sowing a Healthy Gallatin

When I set out to write this article about landscaping, native wildflowers, and summer irrigation, it was dumping snow and below freezing. Now, it’s 65 and sunny. Ahhhhhh, spring in Montana. The calendar might say one thing, but Mother Nature always has her own...
All Forward for the Gallatin

All Forward for the Gallatin

The mad dash of the holidays is behind us and winter has settled in across the upper Gallatin watershed. Finally, we’ve had some time to reflect on a busy 2019. At the Gallatin River Task Force, it was a year of change, growth, and progress, and that transition has...
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